Tuesday, December 14, 2010

FATIGUE ON CHEMICAL TANKERS-- CAPT AJIT VADAKAYIL


MLC 2006 --

It is good that ILO has come out with a scheme for rest hours for exploited chemical sailors--who are forced to do manual tank cleaning at night with deck lights on--

(low freeboard means, a mindless alteration of course by an OOW who cant understand ocean swell-- and crew get washed overboard.)

The ship master must have the courage of his convictions, to address the fatigue and human burn out  problem on board his ship-- and to enforce the MLC 2006 rest hours and crew care guidelines --


Master is there to take care of his crew and owners property-- not to wimp out to the greedy charterers, who want to make an extra dollar .

All safety policies of such greedy houses are just lip service, including the SAFETY FIRST stencil on bridge front .

Managers, who want all safety procedures in place with limited crew manning , cry , when crew is given overtime, for a job genuinely done like bridge look out, safety rounds, SMS procedures, PMS procedures etc --


FATIGUE BUSTING TIPS:--


Sailor:--

Have at least 7 hours of uninterrupted sleep in a day.

Have another strategic nap of 45 minutes at another convenient time.

Ensure your pillow meets your ergonomic comfort standard, a stiff neck does not help.

Ensure your bed does not have a camber toward the middle where you sleep in a groove.

A dark ,cool and quiet environment in the cabin helps.

Avoid caffeine at least 6 hours before sleep.

Exercise regularly.

Eat regular and well balanced meals.

Visit the toilet before you hit your bed—a warm shower does wonders.

Surround yourself in your cabin with things which make you feel good.

Cultivate good friendship.


Master:--

Run a happy ship. This is your prize.

Pay personal attention to crew fatigue management, monitor their working hours.

Ensure joining crew are rested before assuming duties.

Lookout for stress inducers like language, religious or cultural isolation.

Ensure adequate shore leave .

Ensure there is on board recreation and quality of life—the sailors are not slaves.

Provide family communications, like Satcom phone or Email.

Create an atmosphere of safety , security and trust.

Ensure the accommodation temperature and quality of air is comfortable.

Give palatable and balanced food.

Ensure there is good upward and downward communications.

Rotate unpleasant tasks.

Minimise debilitating ship movement, noise and vibrations. Understand there is a TLV for this. Mental fatigue is different from physical fatigue.

Constantly evaluate optimum utilization of shipboard resources.

Give personal attention to sick crew.

Identify in a proactive manner, risk factors which can degrade crew performance, leading to human error. Focus on low cost high returns.

Lack of crew alertness must be identified as a hazard which required instant risk assessment and management.

Be alert to fatigue effects on your crew—
a)Mistakes made due to inability to concentrate.
b)Mood and attitude changes
c)Head aches
d)Heart palpitations as when woken up by loud sound.
e)Poor memory and diminished decision making ability.
f)Giddiness
g)Insomnia
h)Loss of appetite.



Shipbuilders:--

Pay attention to the size of portholes. It is no big secret that a sailor likes to have a large panoramic porthole , which gives a sense of freedom , rather than a pigeon hole opaque porthole.

Ensure the dining room and lounges are larger, more comfortable and better equipped with entertainment facilities, to encourage crew interaction and bonding.

Light management:-- Low intensity green light to improve alertness. Blue light makes you less sleepy sleepy and prevents lapses of concentration. It is understood that most modern radar screens allow you to choose the light shade.

Proper attached toilet facilities respecting need for privacy and storage space for personnel effects reduce stress and create a sense of well being.

A SAFE AND HAPPY SHIP IS THE PRIZE FOR A MASTER AT SEA.  HE SHOULD NOT CARE FOR THE " COMPANY -BLUE- EYED- BOY SYNDROME "


CAPT AJIT VADAKAYIL ( 28 years in command )
..

2 comments:

  1. Nicely written, sir.

    Would you have any RA templates specific to Chem Tanker Ops?
    Is it possible for you to share to increase our knowledge?

    Thanks,
    Joe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. hi jf,

      punch into google search-
      DYNAMIC RISK ASSESSMENT ON CHEMICAL TANKERS VADAKAYIL

      capt ajit vadakayil
      ..

      Delete